The Legacy of a princess

Kamehameha Schools was founded by the will of Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the great-granddaughter of Kamehameha the Great.

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Home I MUA NewsroomInnovation and creativity on display at Ed Tech Conference
KS Kapālama Kula Kiʻekiʻe (high school) Kumu Tisha Louis’ Biology class collaborated with Senior Instructional Technology Specialist Tim Freitas on a makau (fish hook) project, and through a partnership with Paepae o Heʻeia, haumāna were able to test their fish hooks while simultaniously helping to eradicate invasive species at the fish pond.
Innovation and creativity on display at Ed Tech Conference

“Innovation and Creativity” are key facets of the E Ola! Learner Outcomes at Kamehameha Schools, and kumu at KS Kapālama have collaborated with members of the Education Technology Services team to design and implement projects incorporating learner foundations including Aloha ʻĀina (love for the land and its people), ʻIke Kūpuna (ancestral knowledge), and Kūpono (honorable character).

These innovative, engaging classroom applications of educational technology will be discussed and explained at the KS Education Technology Conference, June 4-5 at the Neal Blaisdell Center.

For instance, Kula Kiʻekiʻe (high school) Kumu Tisha Louis’ Biology class collaborated with Senior Instructional Technology Specialist Tim Freitas on a makau (fish hook) project. After researching traditional makau with cultural specialists from the Bishop Museum, haumāna were taken through the “Design Thinking” process involving the Tinkercad web application. After a series of iterations, students 3-D printed their fish hooks, and through a partnership with Paepae o Heʻeia, haumāna were able to test their fish hooks while simultaniously helping to eradicate invasive species at the fish pond.

Kula Waena (middle school) Kumu Malia Kāne, Librarian Judy Yamane and Senior Instructional Technology Specialist Marc Nakayama collaborated on a project called Hē Pālule Mehana (a warm shirt). Kane’s Advance Art class created t-shirts for patients at the Shriners Hospital for Children. Nā haumāna designed native Hawaiian patterns and digitized them on Google Draw, and words of encouragement in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi were included in the design. The student artwork was then cut out digitally and applied to the t-shirts using a heat press. Volunteer haumāna went on a huakaʻi (learning excursion) to the Shriners Hospital to deliver the shirts in person.

Search the hashtag #NaMakaOlino on Twitter for additional highlights of haumāna learning and designing unique creations through the innovative use of technology.

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