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Weekly devotional: Shaped for sharing

Aug. 13, 2021

  • AUTHORS
  • KS Hawaiʻi Kahu Kaunaloa Boshard KSK’77

Ka Ipu o Lono shares weekly devotionals to provide spiritual enrichment to members of the Kamehameha Schools ‘ohana. For more inspiration, visit the KS “Our faith” website.

Heluhelu Baibala
ʻĀnō lā, ʻo ʻoe, e Iēhova, ko mākou Makua,
ʻo mākou nō ka lepo, ʻo ʻoe ko mākou potera,
a ʻo mākou nō a pau ka hana a kou lima.
- Isaia 64:8

Still, Eternal One, You are our Father.
We are just clay, and You are the potter.
We are the product of Your creative action,
shaped and formed into something of worth.
- Isaiah 64:8

He manaʻo o ke kahu
In a recent devotional devotional the idea of our treasure always be within us is a crucial and foundational stance of the Christian faith. God seeks us, we choose salvation through Jesus Christ, and we are given the Holy Spirit. This is the simplistic but correct order of our journey of faith. Now what? Remember the image of our treasure being held within us and we are likened to Jars of Clay? Good! Let me expand on this visual so we can understand the kaona behind the image.

In today’s scripture, the prophet Isaiah deftly describes our God as a Potter who takes our lives from the dust or clay and molds us to become a unique pot. Why pots? Pots are made to carry things, water, oil for food, oil for lamps, and other things. We are created uniquely, and we are blessed and carry within us exceptional talents, skills, and spiritual gifts that allow us to share our uniqueness with others. The real treasure we possess is our faith and the knowledge of the gospel.

In the paukū, the Apostle Paul uses the word Greek word skeuos or vessel to describe the jar that keeps this gospel treasure. Some archaeologists have surmised that Paul may have been talking about ceramic lamps which would support the idea of sharing the light as part of the gospel treasure, but Paul uses skeuos. Interestingly, the Greek word for treasure is thesaurus, that’s right the same word used by Roget to describe his storehouse of treasured words. Jesus uses this word to share a parable about a person who sells all his possessions to buy a field, while Paul uses it to symbolize a real treasure that is the skeuos of clay and referencing the gospel or good news.

Here is where it gets really good! In ancient times jars were also used to carry coins, the money or currency of the period. This practice of depositing coins in a clay jar by a person or family members then burying it was to keep it safe until they needed the money perhaps during hard times to purchase the necessities of life. Thus, the jars carried real treasures of value used to bring life back to the home. Now, this analogy is really making a statement to those who hear about our lives being like jars of clay that hold a great treasure.

Finally, like the jars of antiquity that have eroded over time, our bodies are temporary jars that will eventually fade. So, this temporary shelf life reminds us that we shouldn’t bury this treasure and that the time is now to keep sharing our treasure with others each day! God the Potter has shaped us for sharing the treasure that we hold within to bring life everlasting to all who will accept the gospel. Keep sharing the Good News! E ola mau loa!



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our faith, daily devotional, christian values

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