The Legacy of a princess

Kamehameha Schools was founded by the will of Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the great-granddaughter of Kamehameha the Great.

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HomeI MUA Newsroom KS ‘lifers’ reunite for epic graduation photo
Thirteen years ago, five KS kindergartners were featured in “Aloha is Love,” a children’s book illustrating KS’ deeply held Hawaiian values. Now on the verge of graduation, the students – Grace Moody, Braden Kunihiro, Tayea Chun, Josiah Kunipo, and Drake Lee – gathered for a reunion photo.
KS ‘lifers’ reunite for epic graduation photo

Thirteen years ago, five Kamehameha Schools Kapālama kindergartners were featured in “Aloha is Love,” a children’s book illustrating KS’ deeply held Hawaiian values:  aloha, ‘imi na‘auao, mālama, ‘ike pono, kuleana, ho‘omau and ha‘aha‘a.

“We hoped that the book would help our haumāna learn and live our KS values by showing them examples of how the values can be used in everyday life,” said KS Human Resources Shared Services Coordinator Ed Kunipo. He co-created the book with KS Photographer Michael Young and retired Production Editor Waimea Williams. Kunipo also wrote the “Kamehameha Schools Values Mele” included in the book.

The book is still published and used by KS students and employees today.

Kunipo’s son Josiah was one of the featured keiki. It was his idea to gather the five “lifers” (students who have attended KS from grades K through 12) for a reunion photo. On the eve of their graduation, here is an update on the “Aloha is Love” keiki including how they incorporate Hawaiian values and culture into their lives.

GRACE MOODY
College:
  Southern Methodist University
Major:  Business Accounting and Finance
Most vivid kindergarten memory:  Flying down the hang glider on the elementary school playground during recess.

Which of the Kamehameha values do you practice the most and how?
“‘Imi na‘auao, or to seek wisdom, may be the most prominent value for any student as learning and gathering new knowledge is a daily event. I truly love to learn new things and being challenged through all aspects of my life including in the classroom, in our community, and during everyday occurrences.”

How do you practice your Hawaiian language and culture?
“Being a student at Kamehameha opens up a plethora of opportunities to partake in community service events and traditional practices that are related to the Hawaiian culture. Some of my favorite school memories are being in the lo‘i with my classmates, feeling the mana and connection to our kūpuna through such a crucial part of the Hawaiian’s agriculture system and everyday life.”

How do you hope to make a difference in our local and/or global communities?
“Since I’ll most likely be spending a portion of my life on the mainland, I strive to be an advocate for the Hawaiian culture and spread the knowledge I’ve accumulated throughout my years while radiating the values and aloha only Hawai‘i has. I’m also one to stand my ground and I plan on making my voice heard by supporting causes and events that are meaningful to me and crucial in order to live in a community that I would want the next generation to live in.”

BRADEN KUNIHIRO
College:  University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Major:  Music
Most vivid kindergarten memory: Being nervous to ride the school bus from ‘Ewa Beach to Kapālama, but feeling reassured when he glanced out the window one day, and saw his parents driving alongside the bus.

Which of the Kamehameha values do you practice the most and how?
“‘Imi Na‘auao. I’ve always been a curious person. When I’m interested in something, I have to “know everything about it. Kamehameha Schools has always been a great resource to keep that flame of curiosity burning.”

How do you practice your Hawaiian language and culture?
“Growing up in KS has taught me the values that our kūpuna lived by many years ago. Despite Hawai‘i being so different today, the mana‘o still remains relevant. With life being so complicated, I try to make decisions that would make my kūpuna proud.”

How do you hope to make a difference in our local and/or global communities?
“I hope to make a difference by being a positive example of everything that represents me. Out there in the world, we are a reflection of much more than ourselves. We represent the people and places from which we came. I will do my best to do well in the world, and when I do, it will be in honor of the Hawaiian people.”

TAYEA CHUN
College:  University of Utah
Major:  Finance
Most vivid kindergarten memory: Donning a papier-mâché watermelon hat that she and her dad made, during her class’ Healthy Hat Day Parade.

Which of the Kamehameha values do you practice the most and how?
“Kuleana. I think a big part of this value is the aspect of being an example to those around us.   Being a senior, older sister, and cousin, I’ve always taken it as my responsibility to be a role model for others. Also, as Hawaiians it’s important to share our native culture with others as well as the values we uphold.”

How do you practice your Hawaiian language and culture?
“After being at Kamehameha for the past 13 years, I’ve definitely deepened my understanding of the Hawaiian language and culture. Aside from taking two years of Hawaiian language, I have tried to implement cultural practices and values in my life. I am also a part of the Hui Kua Wehi club, which enables students to take part in numerous work days in efforts to restore the ‘āina.”

How do you hope to make a difference in our local and/or global communities?
“In many parts of the world there is no access to medical care, which can lead individuals to live with untreated health problems. I’m extremely passionate about serving others, and hope to travel to third-world countries someday to help provide care for those who are suffering.”

JOSIAH KUNIPO
College:
  University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Major:  Hawaiian language and education
Most vivid kindergarten memory:  Getting lost before school and crying until his dad picked him up and took him to class.

Which of the Kamehameha values do you practice the most and how?
“I practice all of the Kamehameha values to some degree, but the Hawaiian value that I try to practice most is hō‘ihi – respect. Whether it be among my peers or more importantly with my kumu, kūpuna and those who are older than me, I try my best to give respect and treat others with aloha.”

How do you practice your Hawaiian language and culture?
“This year I really have been able to embrace my love for Hawaiian music and really find my passion for it. Hawaiian music wasn’t always a big interest of mine, but through Concert Glee it became something I really love. Along with playing Hawaiian music I love to be outside in the māla that was made by some of the campus boarders that is right outside of our dorm. We love to tend to the kalo, kanikapila, and just cruise outside surrounded by the beauty of plants that we put so much hard work into caring for.”

How do you hope to make a difference in our local and/or global communities?
“The way I want to be able to make a difference is through my music and sharing with others the importance of mele in our culture.”

DRAKE LEE
College:
  University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Major:  Business management
Most vivid kindergarten memory:  Hanging out in the courtyard before school with friends and riding down the sliding board in the playground. 

Which of the Kamehameha values do you practice the most and how?
“I practice mālama and pono the most. I take care of the land when I see litter or something out of place and when people are feeling down I try and pick them up by telling them jokes. I have somewhat of a moral code so it is very hard for me to break the rules or do something I’m not supposed to. But sometimes you’ve got to take risks.”

How do you practice your Hawaiian language and culture?
“I practice the Hawaiian culture by caring for others and I practice the Hawaiian language by singing songs in ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i every day and by saying mahalo.”

How do you hope to make a difference in our local and/or global communities?
“I hope to someday give my services back to my school or community by creating an event or program benefitting Hawaiian students in need of help.”

STRATEGIC PLAN 2020
SP2020 is a five-year strategic plan that will guide Kamehameha Schools from 2015 to 2020. The plan marks a starting point toward KS’ Vision 2040, which envisions success for all Native Hawaiian learners.

The “Aloha is Love” book helps KS achieve Goal 3 of SP2020 which calls for the cultivation of a strong Native Hawaiian identity in KS learners. It also aligns with Action 5 of Kamehameha Schools’ Ten Actions for fiscal year 2016-17, calling for the integration of cultural principles across the organization.

Tags: ks kapalama, sp2020 goal 3, 16-17action5, hawnculture

Categories: Themes, Culture, Newsroom, Campus Programs, Kapalama