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Kamehameha Schools was founded by the will of Bernice Pauahi Bishop, the great-granddaughter of Kamehameha the Great.

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HomeI MUA Newsroom Advent Week 2 - “E Hoʻomākaukau ʻOukou I Alanui No Iēhova – Prepare the Way of the Lord”
Kamehameha Schools Maui Kahu Kalani Wong shares our second Advent devotional – “E Hoʻomākaukau ʻOukou I Alanui No Iē with ahova – Prepare the Way of the Lord” with a special wikīo hīmeni (video hymn) performed by KSM jumor Chase Fevella.
Advent Week 2 - “E Hoʻomākaukau ʻOukou I Alanui No Iēhova – Prepare the Way of the Lord”

KS envisions its learners to be grounded in Christian and Hawaiian values. To celebrate the coming of Christmas, nā kahu o Kamehameha have created weekly Hawaiian-focused Advent devotionals for haumāna and others to follow and share.

It’s the holiday season.  A great time for parties and getting together with family and friends.  My wife and I tend to keep our home pretty clean but if we were to have friends over, there’s a whole other level of clean. 

We’ll go through a whole container of wet wipes and several Swiffer pads to be able to pass the white glove test.  Since it’s Christmas, all the decorations need to come out to create a festive mood.  Of course, you gotta have food and it can’t be just chips and canned dip.  So much goes into preparing for guests coming over. 

What if that guest were an aliʻi?  What more would you do?  This is also the season of Makahiki. It was a time when a truce was called and all warring ceased.  It was a time for ke aliʻi to visit his people. On Maui, King Pi‘ilani built a trail that stretched around the entire island so he could easily make his way around on his annual visit.  Folks would hurry before him clearing the path of any obstacles and filling in any holes so the mōʻī’s journey would be smooth. 

The makaʻāinana made a variety of preparations to welcome the aliʻi to their ahupuaʻa and to hoʻokupu (offer) their tributes.  In various places the edges of the ponds were decorated so that when the aliʻi drink, the petals of the ʻōhiʻa lehua would tickle their faces.  They would decorate nā hale with fragrant vines such as maile to scent the air. 

The people would kālua the puaʻa and chew the ʻawa so that when the aliʻi arrived all is ready on time and there was little to no waiting.  Even nature played a role in greeting ke aliʻi.  As one approached Waiʻehu, ka makani kili oʻopu carried the scent of broiled fish, a favorite of the mōʻī.  Or in Kaimū, Puna, people would bend down the niu so that they seem to be bowing down in honor of the aliʻi.  Much went on to prepare for the coming of the aliʻi.

In preparation for the coming of Ke Aliʻi o Nā Aliʻi, the way would be made clear.  Roads in those days followed the trade routes, weaving from city to city.  The voice calls us to make the way straight for Ke Aliʻi.  Forget the turns and the twists.  Go right through the desert.  The valleys would be filled in and the mountains made low.  Nothing would impede His coming.

The season of Advent marks the coming of Jesus, Ke Aliʻi o Nā Aliʻi.  The birth of the Christ-child, Emmanuel, means God is with us.  Yet do we live as if God is with us?  What road blocks do we put up to keep Ke Akua from being in our midst?  Within the last several weeks, I’m sure we put a lot of effort into making a list of all those we need to get gifts for, researching the best gift for each person, checking out the ads, maybe even parking ourselves on the couch shopping online, waiting for the lightning deal to go live. 

Are we missing out the true meaning of Christmas?  In the midst of your party or gift giving preparations, take time for your heart preparation.  Clear the pathway to your mind daily to see the gift of life in Christ that we have been given.  Start off each day by waking up ten minutes earlier and spend that time in prayer asking Ke Akua to open your eyes so you might see His presence around you.  During the day, share the gift of Iesu Kristō with others in real and genuine ways.  When you lay down to sleep, say a prayer thanking Ke Akua Manaloa for His watchful presence over you.

Make a way in the wilderness for the coming of the Lord, let the valleys be filled and the mountains made low.  Let Ke Akua rule in your lives so you might see Emmanuel, God with us.

KS Maui junior Chase Fevella brings his own touch to the traditional hīmeni “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.” Use this a background each morning to pule as you offer up the day as an offering to Ke Akua, that you might share his aloha with those you meet. Use it as a background in the evening as you offer a pule mahalo for the way that you have been blessed because Ke Akua was with you throughout the day.This nahenahe mele composed by KS Hawai‘i Kahu Kaunaloa Boshard and his ‘ohana, proclaims, “Pā mai ana nā makani ʻehā i ka nū kamahaʻo” – the four winds blow heralding the wondrous news. “E hiki mai ana ke Aliʻi, Mana Loa The Almighty King is coming.” If you are unable to view this video, please try a different browser.

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December 01, 2017

Advent Week 1 – Mai nā Makani ʻEhā:  From the Four Winds

KS envisions its learners to be grounded in Christian and Hawaiian values. To celebrate the coming of Christmas, nā kahu o Kamehameha have created Hawaiian-focused Advent devotionals for haumāna and others to follow and share.


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